4 Unbelievable Biscuit Recipes You Will Ever See

Quick breads are one of those things that can be really bad for your heart healthy diet, high in fat and sodium and mostly empty calories from white flour and white sugar. We’ve attacked that problem head on, creating a long list of healthy quick breads for you to choose from. There are biscuits, cornbread, coffee cakes, and more than 30 kinds of muffins. Most have both reduced fat and whole grains to make them healthier. You could also easily make them lower in sodium by using a reduced sodium or sodium-free baking powder. For example, the biscuits in the first recipe that have 255 mg of sodium would have only 13 with sodium-free baking powder.

1. Reduced Fat Biscuits

This is a basic biscuit recipe, to which you could add other herbs and spices, a little low fat cheese, or whatever strikes your fancy. They can be made as drop biscuits as well as the rolled and cut version described below.

  • 2 cups (250 g) flour
  • 4 teaspoons (18.4 g) baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons (8 g) sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) cream of tartar
  • 1/4 cup (56 g) unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup (160 ml) skim milk

Preheat oven to 450°F (230°C, or gas mark 8). Stir together flour, baking powder, sugar, and cream of tartar. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add milk. Stir until just mixed. Knead gently on a floured surface a few times. Press to 1/2-inch (1.3-cm) thickness. Cut out with a 2 1/2-inch (6.3-cm) biscuit cutter. Transfer to an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until golden brown.

Yield: 10 servings

Per serving: 142 calories (30% from fat, 9% from protein, 60% from carbohydrate); 3 g protein; 5 g total fat; 4 g saturated fat; 1 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 21 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 89 mg phosphorus; 139 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 255 mg sodium; 87 mg potassium; 273 IU vitamin A; 65 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 10 mg cholesterol; 19 g water Tip: If you don’t have a biscuit cutter, you can use a drinking glass or just cut the dough into squares with a knife.

2. Whole Wheat Biscuits

A small variation of the standard biscuit recipe. I added a little dill to them when we had them with the Swedish Salmon Stew . You could also add a little cheese or other herbs and spices. If you don’t have a biscuit cutter, you can use a drinking glass or just cut it into squares with a knife.

  • 1/2 cups (188 g) flour
  • 1/2 cup (60 g) whole wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons (8 g) sugar
  • 1 tablespoons (13.8 g) baking powder
  • 1/4 cup (56 g) unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup (160 ml) skim milk

Preheat oven to 450°F (230°C, or gas mark 8). Stir together flours, sugar, and baking powder. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add milk. Stir until just mixed. Knead gently on a floured surface a few times. Press to 1/2- inch (1.3-cm) thickness. Cut out with a 2 1/2-inch (6.3-cm) biscuit cutter. Transfer to an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until golden brown.

Yield: 10 servings

Per serving: 141 calories (30% from fat, 10% from protein, 60% from carbohydrate); 4 g protein; 5 g total fat; 4 g saturated fat; 1 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 22 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 153 mg phosphorus; 275 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 498 mg sodium; 80 mg potassium; 274 IU vitamin A; 65 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 10 mg cholesterol; 19 g water

3. Lower-Fat Restaurant-Style Biscuits

This recipe has the flakiness and the buttery flavor typical of biscuits served at fast food chicken restaurants, but without the fat and sodium.

  • 2 cups (250 g) flour
  • 1 tablespoon (13.8 g) baking powder
  • 4 tablespoons (56 g) unsalted butter, divided
  • 2 ounces (55 g) fat-free sour cream
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) club soda, at room temperature

Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C, or gas mark 5). Stir flour and baking powder together. Cut in 2 tablespoons (28 g) butter with a pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Mix sour cream and club soda into flour mixture.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead lightly. Roll or pat to 1/2-inch (1.3-cm) thickness. Cut into 6 biscuits with a biscuit cutter or sharp knife. Place biscuits in an 8 × 8-inch (20 × 20-cm) baking dish sprayed with nonstick vegetable oil spray. Melt remaining butter and pour over the top. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until golden brown.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 232 calories (32% from fat, 9% from protein, 59% from carbohydrate); 5 g protein; 8 g total fat; 6 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 33 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 109 mg phosphorus; 158 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 335 mg sodium; 66 mg potassium; 435 IU vitamin A; 101 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 14 mg cholesterol; 34 g water

4. Lower-Fat Cornbread

Cornbread goes well with a lot of things. (It’s also great reheated with a little honey or syrup for breakfast.) I’ve found here, like with a lot of recipes, that reducing the amount of fat called for doesn’t really affect the end product at all.

  • 1 cup (140 g) cornmeal
  • 1 cup (125 g) flour
  • 1/4 cup (50 g) sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (13.8 g) baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup (235 ml) skim milk
  • 1 egg

Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C, or gas mark 7). Mix together cornmeal, flour, sugar, and baking powder.

Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir milk and egg together and add to dry ingredients, stirring until just mixed. Place in a 9-inch (23-cm) square pan sprayed with nonstick vegetable oil spray and bake for 20 to 25 minutes.

Yield: 12 servings

Per serving: 133 calories (17% from fat, 11% from protein, 73% from carbohydrate); 4 g protein; 2 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 24 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 81 mg phosphorus; 103 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 165 mg sodium; 88 mg potassium; 189 IU vitamin A; 35 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 35 mg cholesterol; 26 g water

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